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Data as a Service Authors: Jason Bloomberg, Louis Nauges, William Schmarzo, Jim Kaskade, Bob Gourley

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Why Installing Too Many Plugins Can Be A Security Disaster

Too Many Plugins Can Be A Security Disaster

As the most popular content management system on the web, WordPress is no stranger to security vulnerabilities - and as anyone who’s been following the news will tell you, there’s been some downright nasty ones over the years. Thing is...it’s not usually core WordPress that puts users at risk.

It’s plugins.

One of the greatest strengths of WordPress is its diverse plugin ecosystem. Even a cursory glance at official directories will show you scores of different tools, each designed to fit a specific need. Here’s the thing about those tools - they aren’t all designed by veteran developers.

As a matter of fact, plenty of them are designed by novices or hobbyists. And while they might be perfectly capable of putting together a seamless, perfectly-architected plugin, they also make mistakes. And those mistakes frequently pertain to security.

Maybe they aren’t aware of WordPress’s coding standards, so their code lacks syntax and is a bug-riddled mess. Maybe they’re trying to be fancy with their code, so they use libraries that aren’t already included with WordPress. Or maybe their testing just didn’t uncover every possible bug.

Either way, their plugin contains an avenue through which its users can be attacked.

And note that this doesn’t apply to any one plugin. These issues are amplified with each plugin you install - every added component in your WordPress installation is another potential attack route. That may sound like fearmongering, but it’s not.

“Depending on which plugins you have installed, how many are active, how they are coded, and what their purpose is, a number of potential issues can arise,” writes wpmudev’s Joe Fylan.“There will be some element of risk with whatever software you decide to install.”

It isn’t just security either, of course. A site that’s bogged down with plugins can become buggy, slow to load, and incredibly resource-intensive. Basically, the lesson here is that you want to be sparing with what you pump into your site, and only use what you need.

So...How Many Is Too Many?

At this point, a lot of you are probably wondering how you can tell if you’re using too many plugins on your own site. Unfortunately, I don’t really have a hard number for you. WP Curve co-founder Dan Norris puts it somewhere in the ballpark of twenty, but honestly, there aren’t really any concrete rules.  Just use what’s necessary to run your site, and don’t go beyond that.

Oh, and whatever plugins you use, make sure you always keep them up to date. That’s just basic housekeeping.

About Matthew Davis -- Matthew works as an inbound marketer and blogger for Future Hosting, a leading provider of VPS hosting. Follow Future Hosting on Twitter at @fhsales, Like them on Facebook and check out their tech/hosting blog,http://www.futurehosting.com/blog.

More Stories By Matt Davis

Matthew Davis works as an inbound marketer and blogger for Future Hosting, a leading provider of VPS hosting. Follow Future Hosting on Twitter at @fhsales and check out their tech/hosting blog, https://www.futurehosting.com/blog.